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Thread: paint too transparent

  1. #1
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    Default paint too transparent

    Hi,

    I'm using XF-1 (Flat Black) on a motorycle part but the paint seems too transparent and brush marks are very visible. Is this normal? Would using a primer instead of applying directly onto the plastic first help?
    I'm new to this, the first paint I used for this model was the XF-16 (Flat Aluminium) and that was very opaque, primer not necessary.

    Thanks.

  2. #2
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    Is it normal? You bet it is. I think it's something everyone has struggled with. It's why so many builders learn how to use an airbrush including myself.

    Primer would help because a primed surface accepts paint better. On bare plastic you're going to be pushing paint around - there's very little for it to bite into. I prime everything as a rule. When I brush XF-1, I normally use a really soft brush to minimize brush marks - but they're always going to be there to some degree because you're using a brush. If you could safely spray lacquer you could get a can of Tamiya flat black. It will present another challenge - learning how to use a spray can - but you could practice on something else before you actually paint the part. You can get good results on small areas with a good brush but if you're looking for an even coating of flat black without brush marks you're probably going to have to spray it.

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    ayimat (02-15-2012)

  4. #3
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    Stupid question, but have you mixed it properly?

    I have used many XF1's with no problem (enamal)
    VORSPRUNG!

  5. #4
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    i'm using acrylic, i haven't mixed it with anything, just straight out of the 10ml jar.
    are you getting better results with enamel?

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    try to use the tamiya enamels, they are much better,for me, you have to usually order the enamels overseas,dont know why they dont sell in u.s.? stopped using acylics long ago .plenty of sellers on ebay,,try to use airbrush as much as possiable.i go thru much masking tape,,,but much better than brushing,,,good luck!

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    ayimat (02-16-2012)

  8. #6
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    Default

    I have been a confirmed user of Tamiya Acrylics for many years but as has been pointed out, you are best off obtaining and using an airbrush to apply them. Part of the issue with brush painting is the fact that they start to dry so rapidly when used with a brush, often you find that the latest stroke will stick to the last coat and pull it away from your model or part. The way around this is to go to an art shop and purchase an Acrylic paint retarder, and add it to a small amount of paint in the ratios that will be marked on its container [retarder]. You will still need to thin the Tamiya paint with an appropriate thinner, so that it will flow properly; then apply it in nice thin coats, then allow an appropriate time for the coat to dry, before repeating the process a number of times until the required effect is achieved.

    However even if you decide that it is not worth spending tons of money on an airbrush and compressor, there are many different ones on the market that are priced so as to offer a great entry level tool, that will pay for itself even if you only use it for spraying base coats, then sticking with the good old fashioned paint brush to complete the job. These are powered by spray cans of air, inner tubes, CO2 bottles, with an appropriate fitting adaptor. However if you persevere with an airbrush, what is the betting that you buy other units as your skill and experience builds and you use it for more and more of a build process.

    There are also other manufacturers of Acrylic paints, that are made up of different chemical mixtures of pigment, thinner, resin etc etc, that do make them more friendly to brush painting and still offer dedicated thinners, retardents and materials to allow different effects or density of shade, to allow the modeller/artist a great deal of choice in use. Vallejo is one such manufacturer offereing excellent quality of supplies, that I am many others use alongside our Tamiya Paints.

    I hope this quick few paragraphs helps you, but come back if other questions arise as there are many good hearted and committed modellers here, of diferent levels of skill and experience, who are only too pleased to help other members.

    Aye,

    John

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    ayimat (02-16-2012)

  10. #7
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    Well that is the main reason why you should be doing layers for your paint.

    I mean, the first layer is expected to be really thin and the next ones would ensure that you are going to cover all the areas that were left. And in any case that would not be possible, you just have to see and consider them to work lightly.

    Hope that helps you with your problem.

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